9 things you have to learn about Cu Chi Tunnels

9 things you have to learn about Cu Chi Tunnels

Cu Chi Tunnels are about 200 km long, built for use during periods of Vietnam War. They are located on the outskirts of Ho Chi Minh City, about 60km from the city. This Cu Chi Tunnels are among the top 7 most exotic destinations in Vietnam and are listed as one of the world’s coolest places by The New York Time. Currently, Cu Chi Tunnels are used as a war remnants museum.

1. Why Cu Chi Tunnels were built?

Originally, Cu Chi Tunnels were built during the war against the French colonialists (1945-1954), Vietnam revolutionary soldiers hid under the secret tunnels in the enemy’s rear, protected by the people. Those secret tunnels were constructed in many ways, but mostly under the ground, each of which had only one small lid for one person to move. When closing the lid of the cover, the enemies above ground had a difficult time detecting the tunnel entrances.


However, the downside of this secret tunnel is that Vietnamese soldiers were easily captured by the enemy or destroyed when detected. From there, it was thought that they should be extended into long tunnels with many ways out on the ground to shelter and fight the enemy while providing an escape from danger if need be.

2. How Cu Chi Tunnels were built

Cu Chi Tunnels were not only used for combat and conflict, they also housed the factory workers who provided weapons and war equipment. It had stockpiles of firearms, ammunition and explosives of all kinds, food and materials, battlefield facilities, smoke free kitchens (Hoang Cam kitchen), hospitals for the wounded, and bedrooms and shelters for women, children and the elderly. It is not just a village but an entire city under the ground.
In the tunnel system, each of the different locations has specially closed gates used to stop the enemy or toxic gas. All tunnels have secret vents to the ground and are very discreetly camouflaged.
The anti-infantry system was densely interwoven at the entrances to ensure safety. During the war, it could contain an army or be full of the village’s residents, which helped the Vietnamese protect many lives.
The anti-infantry system was densely interwoven at the entrances to ensure safety. During the war, it could contain an army or be full of the village’s residents, which helped the Vietnamese protect many lives.

4. Reliving The War Zone

As the name suggests, this area is the place where visitors can watch slow-motion “footage” of the entire war in Cu Chi Tunnels. Visitors will see pictures of strategic hamlets, US military posts and disputed areas between the two armies. 1960 – 1964: The image of the army and people of Cu Chi, 1964-1965: building trenches, deploying battles, transporting weapons. From 1966-1973 the landscape above ground was destroyed and ruined, causing people to move to live underground. In addition to the models and sound systems to illustrate the context of war, visitors can also talk with the people who lived and fought in Cu Chi during the war.

5. National Sport Shooting Range

To participate, you will have to buy bullets around 60.000 VND/bullet. Minimum an order is 10 bullets. For these bullets you can share into two. You will be instructed how to shoot the gun and try shooting it for themselves.


6. Entertainment service

First of all, travel programs will often take visitors around before opening up the entertainment services, allowing visitors to familiarize themselves with the culture and history of the tunnels before indulging in more interactive experiences.
To ensure safety, you only have to go down when accompanied by guides, which are always included in the tour.

7. The best time to visit Cu Chi Tunnels

Although the visiting place operates all year round, visitors should travel anytime even in the rainy season in the South of Vietnam. The tunnel tour can wet but nice experience when travelers have chance to try rain coat, a typical wear of local people in raining season…So just visit the Cu Chi Tunnels whenever you have time.


8. How to get there

By bus

Buses are a popular choice for travelers from the center of Saigon going to Cu Chi Tunnels. You can hop on the bus at the Ben Thanh bus station, but remember that Saigon buses only stop when you wave your hands to them.

Ben Duoc tunnel

Take the bus Number 13 (Ben Thanh – Cu Chi) or 94 (Cho Lon – Cu Chi) to get to Cu Chi bus station, then take the bus Number 79 (Cu Chi – Dau Tieng ) to Ben Duoc.

Ben Dinh tunnel

Take the bus Number 13 (Ben Thanh – Cu Chi) or 94 (Cho Lon – Cu Chi) to An Suong bus station, then take the bus Number 122 to Tan Quy bus station. From here, take the bus Number 70 to Ben Dinh.
However, you will miss the wildlife rescue station and beautiful scenery along the way if traveling by bus.

By Motorcycle Or Car

Drive toward the An Suong – Highway 22, but please be aware that it is quite far. Without a native guide, visitors should not choose this option. You can contact with us for booking tour to visit this Cu Chi Tunnels

9. Safety

With a total length of 200km, only a part of the tunnel has been maintained and controlled by the management so there are still many places out of the reach of the guides. Moreover, the tunnels lack light, oxygen, and cellular signal. It is also difficult to use map… You need to follow the guides to avoid getting lost. Please be careful that there are narrow tunnel passages only for one person to move. For complex sightseeing areas like Cu Chi, Vietnam Holidays Travel suggests visitors to prioritize having a local companion to ensure their safety and convenience.

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